Alexis Grinde Ph.D.

Head and shoulder picture of a woman.
Professional Title
Wildlife Ecologist

About

My research focuses on conservation ecology including studying the large-scale impacts of environmental change on wildlife, biodiversity, and ecosystem function. Applications of my research include informing forest management decisions in relation to changing land use patterns and providing recommendations for conservation plans for species of conservation concern.

Education

  • PhD. Integrated Biological Sciences, University of Minnesota, 2015
  • MS. Biology, University of North Dakota, 2005
  • BS. Biology, Bemidji State University, 2001

Recent Publications

Effects of human land use on avian functional and taxonomic diversity within the upland coastal zone of the North American Great Lakes

4 months ago
Effets de l'utilisation des terres par l'homme sur la diversité fonctionnelle et taxonomique de l'avifaune dans les hautes-terres côtières des Grands Lacs d'Amérique du NordTranslated title of the contribution: Effects of human land use on avian functional and taxonomic diversity within the upland coastal zone of the North American Great LakesBracey, A. M., Kovalenko, K. E., Niemi, G., Giese, E. E. G., Howe, R. W. & Grinde, A. R., Aug 2022, In: Avian Conservation and Ecology. 17, 2, 6.

Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review

Featured Research Projects

The ForCAST tool attempts to provide forestry professionals and land managers with an opportunity to evaluate how a changing climate and changing markets might a

A study of habitat and survival rates of species in decline to inform forest management practices.

The Minnesota Breeding Bird Atlas documents the distribution of every breeding bird species in Minnesota and provides a solid foundation for future conservation efforts.

NRRI News Articles

NRRI ornithologist helps forest managers help wildlife with research and conservation.

The quiet, brown speckled woodcock is difficult for scientists to find in the forest for research. Enter the pointing dog.

Understanding what's best for wildlife after tree harvesting is not straightforward. NRRI scientists are unraveling the research.

Media Coverage